Other Australian Flags

Australian Aboriginal Flag

Australian Aboriginal Flag

Australian Aboriginal Flag

The Australian Aboriginal Flag was first raised on 12 July 1971 at Victoria Square in Adelaide. It was also used at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in Canberra in 1972.

The top half of the flag is black to symbolise Indigenous people. The red in the lower half stands for the earth and the colour of ochre, which has ceremonial significance. The circle of yellow in the centre of the flag represents the sun.

The Australian Aboriginal Flag is displayed at Aboriginal centres and is well recognised as the flag of Aboriginal peoples of Australia. It is flown during NAIDOC Week to celebrate and promote greater understanding of Indigenous peoples and culture and during National Reconciliation Week in recognition of 27 May as the anniversary of the 1967 Referendum which removed from the Constitution clauses that discriminated against indigenous Australians and 3 June as the anniversary of the High Court decision in the Eddie Mabo land rights case of 1992.


Colour references for the Australian Aboriginal Flag are:

  • Red PANTONE® 179
  • Yellow PANTONE® 123

Mr Harold Thomas from Northern Australia designed the flag.

The Australian Aboriginal Flag was proclaimed on 14 July 1995.

Permission is not required to fly the Australian Aboriginal Flag.

The Australian Aboriginal Flag is protected by copyright and may only be reproduced in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright Act 1968 or with the permission of Mr Harold Thomas. Contact details are:

Mr Harold Thomas
PO Box 41807
CASUARINA NT 0810

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Torres Strait Islander Flag

Torres Strait Islander Flag

Torres Strait Islander Flag

The Torres Strait Islander Flag was adopted in May 1992 during the Torres Strait Islands Cultural Festival.

The green panels at the top and bottom of the flag represent the land and the central blue panel represents the sea. The black lines dividing the panels represent the Torres Strait Islander people.

The centre of the flag shows a white dhari (dancer’s headdress) and is a symbol for all Torres Strait Islanders.

Underneath the dhari is a white five-pointed star. The star is an important symbol for navigating the sea. The points of the star represent the island groups in the Torres Strait and white symbolises peace.

Colour references for the Torres Strait Islander Flag are:

  • Blue PANTONE® 301
  • Green PANTONE® 3288.

The Torres Strait Islander Flag is flown during NAIDOC Week and Reconciliation Week.

The design of the Torres Strait Islander Flag was the winning entry in a competition organised by the Island Coordinating Council.

The Torres Strait Islander Flag was proclaimed on 14 July 1995.

Permission is not required to fly the Torres Strait Islander Flag.

The Island Coordinating Council holds copyright in the Torres Strait Islander Flag. Requests for permission to reproduce the Torres Strait Islander Flag should be addressed to the Secretary of the Island Coordinating Council. Contact details are:

PO Box 501
Thursday Island QLD 4875
Telephone: (07) 4069 1446
Fax: (07) 4069 1868

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Defence Ensigns

Australian Defence Force Ensign

Australian Defence Force ensign

Australian white ensign (Navy)

Australian white ensign (Navy)

The Royal Australian Air Force ensign (Blue)

The Royal Australian Air Force ensign (Blue)

The flags of the Australian Defence Force and government services have also become known as ensigns.

The Australian Army has no separate ensign but has the ceremonial role of protector of the Australian National Flag.

The Australian Defence Force ensign represents the three services of the Australian Defence Force. The defence force emblem in the centre of the flag is a symbol of the three services. The crossed swords represent the Australian Army, the anchor represents the Royal Australian Navy and the eagle represents the Royal Australian Air Force.

The red stripe on the flag represents the Australian Army, the dark blue stripe represents the Royal Australian Navy and the light blue stripe represents the Royal Australian Air Force.

The Commonwealth Star and the boomerang on the Australian Defence Force ensign represent Australia.

The Australian Defence Force ensign was proclaimed on 12 April 2000.

The Royal Australian Navy adopted the Australian white ensign in 1967. The Australian white ensign is an Australian National Flag with a white background. It is flown from the stern of naval vessels. The Australian National Flag is flown from the bow.

The Royal Australian Air Force ensign was adopted in 1948. It is an Australian National Flag with a light blue background. A leaping red kangaroo was added in 1982.

Order of Precedence for Defence Ensigns

The order of precedence for Defence Ensigns is:

  • Australian National Flag
  • Australian Defence Force ensign
  • Australian white ensign
  • Royal Australian Air Force ensign

Australian Red Ensign

The Australian Red Ensign

The Australian Red Ensign

When the Commonwealth Government announced a competition to design a flag for Australia in 1901, entrants were asked to send a design for two flags – one for official and naval purposes and the other for merchant ships.

The resulting Commonwealth red ensign or merchant flag was identical to the Australian National Flag (or Commonwealth blue ensign as it was then known) except that it had a red background instead of a blue one.

Historically, the Australian red ensign was used on land and at sea and Australians have fought under it during both world wars.

There was considerable confusion in the first half of the 20th century over the appropriate use of the red ensign as opposed to the blue ensign.

This was clarified with the passage of the Flags Act 1953 which proclaimed the blue ensign as the Australian National Flag. The Australian Red Ensign became the official flag to be flown at sea by Australian registered merchant ships.

September 3 each year, as well as being Australia National Flag Day, is also Merchant Navy Day.  Organisations and individuals commemorating Merchant Navy Day can choose to fly the Australian Red Ensign.  While it is generally only flown at sea, the Australian Red Ensign may be flown on land for ceremonial purposes such as Merchant Navy Day.  When the Australian Red Ensign is flown along with the Australian National Flag, the Australian National Flag should be flown in the position of honour.

Centenary Flag

Centenary Flag

Centenary Flag

The Centenary Flag was presented to the Prime Minister on behalf of the people of Australia by the Australian National Flag Association on 3 September 2001 to mark the 100th anniversary of the day the Australian National Flag was first flown.

The Centenary Flag is an Australian National Flag with a white headband incorporating a cardinal red stripe and an inscription.

The Centenary Flag was proclaimed on 13 September 2001.

Other flags

Other Australian Government flags represent specific government services.

The Civil Air Ensign The Australian Customs Flag The Australian Federal Police Flag

Other flags - The Civil Air Ensign,
The Australian Customs Flag and
The Australian Federal Police Flag

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Last Updated: 16 August, 2013